Movies

TV Series: Veep

Writers: Armando Iannucci

Plot: Veep has received critical acclaim and won several major awards. It has been nominated five years in a row for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy Series, winning the award for its fourth and fifth seasons. Its second and fourth seasons won the Writers Guild of America Award for Television: Comedy Series, with the third season winning the Television Critics Association Award for Outstanding Achievement in Comedy. Louis-Dreyfus has won five consecutive Primetime Emmy Awards, two Screen Actors Guild Award, two Critics’ Choice Television Awards and one Television Critics Association Award for her performance. Supporting cast members Anna Chlumsky and Tony Hale have both received four consecutive Emmy nominations for their work on the series, including Hale winning in 2013 and 2015.

  TV Series: House of cards (2013)

Director: David Fincher

Writers: Jeff Beal

Plot: Set in present-day Washington, D.C., House of Cards is the story of Frank Underwood (Kevin Spacey), a Democrat from South Carolina’s 5th congressional district and House Majority Whip. After being passed over for appointment as Secretary of State, he initiates an elaborate plan to get himself into a position of greater power, aided by his wife, Claire Underwood (Robin Wright). The series deals primarily with themes of ruthless pragmatism, manipulation and power.

Lincoln Movie: Lincoln (2013)

How the president and Congress operate.

Director: Steven Spielberg

Writers: Tony Kushner (screenplay), Doris Kearns Goodwin (book)

Actor: Daniel Day-Lewis, Sally Field, David Strathairn

Plot: In 1865, as the American Civil War winds inexorably toward conclusion, U.S. president Abraham Lincoln endeavors to achieve passage of the landmark constitutional amendment which will forever ban slavery from the United States. However, his task is a race against time, for peace may come at any time, and if it comes before the amendment is passed, the returning southern states will stop it before it can become law. Lincoln must, by almost any means possible, obtain enough votes from a recalcitrant Congress before peace arrives and it is too late. Yet the president is torn, as an early peace would save thousands of lives. As the nation confronts its conscience over the freedom of its entire population, Lincoln faces his own crisis of conscience — end slavery or end the war.